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International

The United States demands greater pressure from Mexico in the fight against drug trafficking

The López Obrador government increases the pace of extraditions while Washington asks to stop fentanyl traffic.
The relationship between Mexico and the United States enters a new phase. In the middle of the election year, Washington has increased the demands on the Government of Andrés Manuel López Obrador regarding security and the fight against drug trafficking. The Trump Executive expects that an increase in pressure against drug trafficking will obtain results such as those achieved in migration, where Mexicans have reduced the flow to the U.S. border between May and December 2019 with a heavy hand.

The relationship between Mexico and the United States enters a new phase. In the middle of the election year, Washington has increased the demands on the Government of Andrés Manuel López Obrador regarding security and the fight against drug trafficking. The Trump Executive expects that an increase in pressure against drug trafficking will obtain results such as those achieved in migration, where Mexicans have reduced the flow to the U.S. border between May and December 2019 with a heavy hand.

For now, Mexico has increased the pace of its extraditions to the north. On Monday, January 13, the Mexican authorities handed over eight criminals to the United States. Among them Gilberto Barragán Balderas, leader of the Gulf Cartel and one of the ten most wanted criminals by the Texas chapter of the US drug agency (DEA). Bonds were also extradited from criminal organizations such as the Juarez Cartel and the Line, which operate in northern Mexico and in the area of ​​the common border.

The US authorities also received this week José Sánchez Villalobos, known as The Lord of the Tunnels, of the Sinaloa Cartel. Villalobos is considered a high-level operator within the criminal structure and faces a trial in California courts for drug trafficking through two tunnels that connected Tijuana, in Mexico, with San Diego, in California. One of them was 122 meters long. The trial of Joaquín El Chapo Guzmán, who is already serving a life sentence in a maximum security prison, has not put an end to the legal offensive against the Sinaloa Cartel.

Last December, and almost in the midst of absolute silence, Mexico gave Ismael Zambada Imperial to the United States, one of Ismael El Mayo Zambada's sons, the veteran leader of the Sinaloa Cartel and one of Mexico's most powerful bosses alongside the of the Jalisco Nueva Generación Cartel, Nemesio Oseguera. Zambada Imperial, called Mayito Gordo, was serving a ten-year prison sentence in Mexico and had been fighting for five years in local courts to prevent his trip to the United States, where he is also required by a Californian court.

It is in this context that the case that the New York prosecutor's office is building against Genaro García Luna, a prominent security officer during the governments of presidents Vicente Fox and Felipe Calderón, is inserted. García Luna, who was in charge of the anti-drug strategy between 2006 and 2012 with the help of the DEA and the FBI, was arrested in early December in Texas and is accused of receiving millions of dollars in bribes from the criminal organization headed by El Chapo Guzmán and El Mayo Zambada. This Tuesday, the former secretary of state will see Judge Brian Cogan, the Brooklyn-based district judge who brought the trial against El Chapo for the first time.

 

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